Understanding Your National Grid Electricity Rate

Your National Grid bill might seem a little incomprehensible to you. It's important to have a full understanding of all the information and details displayed on it, though. If you don't, you might find that mistakes get made by the company without you realizing. This summary of what's included on the bill will help you understand it.

Lowering your National Grid Bill

The first step in reducing your National Grid electricity rate is to look at the Energy Supply rate you are paying. The EIA (U.S. Energy Information Administration) states the typical rate for electricity in the National Grid region is presently 22.85¢ per kWh. Based on this price, you could see savings as large as 42% based upon a typical home using 1,000 kWh/month.

Note: The EIA average includes all taxes, transmission and supply fees. That is the “all in” rate and includes all the utility fees and the retail electricity costs. We provide the same “all in pricing” so you get the real “apples to apples” price comparison when you're shopping for energy rates in Massachusetts.

 

1. Your Account Number. You'll need these items when you switch service

2. Your Service Address

3. Your Supply Charges (Your competitve supply cost- You can shop for a batter rate)

4. Your Electricity Delivery/Utility Charges (Transmission, The "Poles and Wires" charges)

5. Your Electricity Supplier (You can shop for a better rate)

National Grid MA Bill

 

Account Details and Billing Period

At the very top of your bill, you will find that your individual account details are displayed. The first thing you should do is ensure that the details are all correct. It will also display the billing period that the bill refers to. It will tell you when you need to make the payment by. This is important because you don't want to get behind with your payments.

Contact Details

Down the left-hand side of the page, the contact details for the company will be displayed. These will be useful for you if you find that any of your account details are displayed incorrectly. You might also need to contact the National Grid if you feel that you have been charged too much for the energy you have used over the period displayed.

Electric Usage History

Directly underneath the contact details, there will be a graph which breaks down the electric usage history. This allows you to see how much energy you have been using. It will also show you what your daily average usage has been during the period that the bill covers. It's good to have access to this information if you're going to try to use less in the future.

Account Balance and Detail of Current Charges

In the middle of the page, underneath the account details, the account balance will be displayed. This is where you will see the amount due. So, you will want to look at this straight away because I'm sure you will be keen to find out exactly how much money you will be expected to pay to the energy company. Underneath that, the detail of the charges will also be displayed.

Delivery and Supply Services

The details are broken down into delivery and supply charges. At the bottom of the first page of the bill, you will find the supply services. This is the amount of money that you are being charged to have the energy supplied to you. Just above this, the delivery charge will be displayed. These two sums added together will equal the overall account balance at the top.

Enrollment Information

On the left-hand side of the second page, you will find the enrollment information. This is the information that will need to be used if you want to switch your energy supplier. Your personal details that you will need to use when making a switch will also be displayed here.

Explanation of Billing Terms and Customer Rights

The explanation of billing terms is important because it allows you to clear up any misunderstandings you might have. You might have to refer to this section if you want to be sure that you understand the bill. Your customer rights are also displayed in this section at the bottom of the bill.